Tag Archives: Temp to Perm Jobs

Temporary Employment Contracts


Temporary Employment Contracts

Temporary Employment Contracts

I’ve mentioned before that companies will often hire on a temp to perm basis but I wanted to tell you about the Temporary Employment Contracts that are generally used.

I’ve been asked in the past questions about how “it worked” and to begin with I was surprised. But then it occurred to me that for anyone that is new to ‘temping’ or ‘contracting’ these are perfectly natural questions.

If you’ve only ever worked in a Permanent Job then taking either a temp to perm job or a temporary job can be a completely new experience.

I’ll try and talk you through what you could expect.

The Contract

When you first read the contract you’ve been given, it can sometimes be a bit confusing, or unnecessarily wordy, and will seem to offer very few guarantees.

The contract that you’re given WILL BE a temporary contract, so it will be worded in such a way, to show that it’s a flexible agreement for both you and the agency.

Some of the key points may be;

The Notice Period

In some contracts there may be an inferred notice period, but no guarantees will be given. It might say something like…

“Any of the Employment Business, the Agency Worker or the Hirer may terminate the Agency Worker’s Assignment at any time without prior notice or liability.”


“In the event that the contract between the Employment Business and the Hirer is terminated for any reason the Assignment shall cease with immediate effect without liability to the Agency Worker (save for payment for hours worked by the Agency Worker up to the date of termination of the Assignment).”

Effectively these clauses are saying the contract can be terminated at any point without any liability, and you will be paid up until the point you left.

Guarantees of Work

There’ll be no guarantee of continued work being offered (although temps that do a good job are normally given first refusal on new contracts coming in – when you’ve finished that one of course)

How To Get Paid

To get paid you need to communicate the hours you’ve worked to the agency, normally via a timesheet signed by an authorised representative of the company.

You will also need to submit your own invoice if you’re being paid via a limited or umbrella company.

Annual Leave

This will be as per the Working Time Directive and will normally need to be taken within the leave year, and can’t be carried over.

You would need to take any time off in agreement with the company you’re working for.

What To Do In The Event of Absence

The short answer is to let the agency know as soon as possible.

Phone, Text, Email, Send a Friend, Leave a Voice Mail, Train a Pigeon to deliver messages if you have to, but tell the agency.

What To Do Next 

Once you’ve understood the contract, the best advice I can give you about determining if the job opportunity is for you is to ASK QUESTIONS.

Ask your agents advice on anything that may be an issue to you.

If you’re worried about the length of the contract, the notice period, how often you will be paid then ASK THE QUESTION.

As a final observation, if you’re concerned about the temporary nature of the job, then maybe temping isn’t for you and you should hold out for a permanent position.

That being said many Temporary Employment Contracts, have given the candidate the chance to prove themselves, ultimately resulting in an offer of a full time position.

If you have any questions or would like further advice, then feel free to leave a comment below.

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What Is Temp to Perm

What is Temp to Perm

What is Temp to Perm

I sometimes get asked about Temp to Perm, and how it works.

I’ve been using the term for so long now that I assume everyone knows what it means.

For anyone that doesn’t, I’ll try and explain it to you as best I can. If anything doesn’t make sense feel free to leave a comment or contact me directly.

Some companies use an Employment Agency or an Employment Business to find staff on their behalf.

Sometimes they’ll engage a company to find a permanent staff member and hire them straight away.

Other times, they’ll go via the Temp to Perm route.

I’ve seen it happen a number of ways and I’ll call them Defined Temp to Perm, Non Defined Temp to Perm and Surprise Temp to Perm.

Defined Temp to Perm

This is where a company actually need Permanent staff, but it’s easier for them to use a Recruitment Agency to find the people for them.

The agency will do all of the searching, which may sometimes including advertising, interviewing, reference checking, arranging any necessary tests and assessments, arrange for the worker to start, pay them, and then after both the worker and the company have had an agreed period of time to make sure they’re both happy, the worker would then convert to the payroll of the company.

This can often be a satisfactory way of hiring new staff/finding a new job for all concerned.

Non Defined Temp to Perm

This is where all of the above will happen, but it’s more because the company are busy, and they expect to remain busy, but in some cases may not be able to see that far ahead.

So they hire someone on a temporary basis, with the possibility that IF the person they selected is proven to be a good addition to the team, and, IF there’s a business case to hire an additional person, and, IF they get approval from the management, then there is a good chance of a permanent job.

A little bit more risky for the company because they run the risk of losing the worker if a better opportunity comes along, and for the worker because if one of those IFs doesn’t come off then, no job.

Surprise Temp to Perm

This is where the role will start off Temporary with no intention for the job to go permanent at all.

All of the conditions happen again as detailed above e.g. company get busy, take on a contractor/temporary worker, and then find, that to their surprise, the worker is a good fit for their business and a permanent job is offered.

The candidate has shown themselves to be such an asset, that the company decide they have to find a way to keep them in the business.

So the department manager will do what they need to do to keep them on and will offer the person a role with the company.

In all of the years I’ve worked in Recruitment, the Temporary to Permanent route has been a very successful way for companies to find workers, and for workers to find jobs.

Done correctly it can be a quick and efficient way to find new people.

Thoughts? Comments? I’d be interested to hear them in the box below…

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